During an Open Space session initiated by The Learning Lab l was invited to participate as space holder/facilitator. Open Space Technology in short is a way of organizing self-managed meetings. It took place at a school in Roosendaal (NL) which is about to face a huge reorganization. Commitment to change/innovation was high.

All stakeholders of the school (teachers, students, parents, local government, companies) participated in the session which was meant to generate the ‘collective intelligence’ of the group, thereby offering a wide scope at possible innovative solutions for the school and all its stakeholders for a new future.
What made it extra challengingOnlangs was ik ‘space holder’ tijdens een Open Space sessie (ook wel ‘Unconference’)  georganiseerd door  The Learning Lab. Open Space Technology in het kort is een manier om zelf-organiserende  bijeenkomsten te beleggen. Het vond plaats in een school in Roosendaal die zich gedwongen ziet tot een enorme reorganisatie. De wil om te veranderen/innoveren was aldus groot.

Alle betrokkenen van de school (docenten, studenten, ouders, gemeentelijk bestuur, bedrijven) namen deel aan de sessie die bedacht was om de collectieve kennis van de groep in te zetten om inzicht te krijgen in mogelijke kansen en innovatieve oplossingen om het voortbestaan van de school te garanderen. Wat het tot een extra uitdaging maakte was the fact that the session was meant to look for, what later proved to be unexpected, connections and cross interests of apparently non-related groups. All stakeholders contributed from a sense of urgency towards innovation and gain in a future situation. Opening up to potential partners proved to disclose a whole new set of possibilities and opportunities, unthought of before, for parties to develop and cooperate. In searching for common interests unexpected mutual denominators and agendas were revealed, resulting in surprising opportunities for cooperation and optimalization of processes. It showed once more the increasing interdependency of stakeholders in a society and economy that is becoming ever more interrelated.

Exchanging products or services traditionally was a one-way sender-receiver affair. Now with continuous shifts in people’s interests, and an increasing ‘you are what you share’ expectation of things, organisations need ever more eyes and ears to understand what’s going on in order to generate a focus on new opportunities. In an ‘open economy’ problems and questions related to these new opportunities become more complex, and thus ever better solved by the ‘wisdom of the crowds’. The latter optimized in this case by a combination of Open Space and Design Thinking preventing group think because of taking a mutual agenda for innovation and action as a startingpoint.
It invites organisations to become connected, self-organised, co-creative networks of people, organisations, initiatives, and processes. The role of the individual hereby shifting with new possibilities for connectivity, interactivity and collaboration that emerge. In all causing quite radical changes in the social and economic fabric of society [¹].

In a traditional competitive attitude often solutions are never smarter than the smartest person alone and still provides for one-way traffic. It means a paradigm shift from competing with eachother to competing together for a better, healthier and strongly represented market.  Opening up and exchanging information proves to be a fruitful strategy in creating coalitions with a common agenda, and collaborations that result in renewed relevance and continuity for organisations in dynamic (globalized) markets and thus shifting agendas. Especially at a time when economically budgets are getting tighter in many ways. Furthermore it forces to sharpen self-awareness about core competencies.
A good example remains the issue of sustainability which has changed from a need for energy efficiency and recycling into a fundamental design principle, affecting everything from the scientific research about workplace structures, to mobility, personal health, and leadership. It creates new roles that support the ‘sustainable organisation'[¹] and demands a wide variety of specialists to cooperate and solve multi-faceted issues of often a global concern.

When talking about Design Thinking [²] this method is becoming ever more acknowledged as an effective tool for (multi disciplinary) problem solving. And as stated before it proves to be extra effective in an Open Space setting. Both with the intent to innovate in their DNA, Open Space defines the agenda (and thus the urgencies at hand) and Design Thinking enables an operative/ready-for-action mindset taking unexplored possibilities for collaborations as an outcome and startingpoint.
Design is able to create awareness around real needs and to create content and competitive advantage. In doing so designers have a people oriented way of working supported by a strategical means-goal attitude. In a lot of areas in society what used to work doesn’t seem to work anymore, questions have become more complex often consisting of a mixture of cultural, social and economic elements. The end of a Design Thinking proces is a product, service or proces facilitating new ways of tackling these shifting questions and therefore needs of people and markets.
Or as Roger Martin states when writing about design- and integrative thinking: ‘Designers can solve the most wicked problems through collaborative, integrative thinking (user-centered), using abductive logic, which means the logic of what might be. Conversely, deductive and inductive logic are the logic of what should be or what is.
The non-integrative thinker readily accepts unpleasant trade-offs whilst the integrative thinker instead seeks creative resolution of the tension. Ergo: in the traditional model, it seems that we are selecting among predetermined alternatives. With a design model we would like to think outside the existing data and alternatives and generate new ones.
Bolland and Collopy claim that decision attitude is predominant in contemporary management theory and practice, where it’s about solving existing, stable problems with clearly specified alternatives through the use of analytical decision tools. By contrast a design attitude views each problem as an opportunity for invention that includes questioning basic assumptions and resolve by new/innovative ideas.’

In all it was a very inspiring day in Roosendaal resulting in a large group of problem owners heading home with plans to get started in creating an improved and embedded learning environment. I’d like to end with quoting Goethe when saying, ‘It’s not so much about coming up with something new as it is about looking again at what’s already there.’


Notes
[¹]  dr. T. Besselink, Recreating Honours Education, 2010

[²]  Design!Public glossary: Design Thinking Ways of thinking, conceptualizing, imagining, and envisioning solutions to problems that (i) redefine the fundamental challenge or task at hand, (ii) develop multiple possible options and solutions in parallel, and (iii) prioritize and select those which are likely to achieve the greatest benefits in terms of, for example, impact, viability, cost.

“Design thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation that draws from the designer’s toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business succes.”
— Tim Brown, president and CEO, IDEO, <http://www.ideo.com/about/>


was dat de sessie bedoeld was om, later onverwacht bewezen, gezamenlijke verbanden en belangen te benoemen van op het eerste oog niet-gerelateerde groepen. Alle belanghebbenden droegen echter bij vanuit een gevoel van urgentie tot innovatie en kansen in een toekomstige situatie. Het openstellen naar potentiële partners bewees onverwachte gemeenschappelijke belangen, kansen en mogelijkheden voor beide partijen om te ontwikkelen en samen te werken. In het zoeken naar overeenkomstige speerpunten werden onverwachte gemene delers en agenda’s onthuld. Resulterend in verrassende kansen tot samenwerking en optimalisering van processen. Het bewees eens te meer dat er sprake is van een toenemende samenhang en afhankelijkheid van belanghebbenden in een veranderend maatschappij en markt.

In een traditioneel (concurrentie) model is een oplossing vaak niet slimmer dan die van de slimste persoon wat veelal leidt tot eenrichtingsverkeer. Echter onophoudelijke verschuivingen in interesses van consumenten en een toenemende roep om transparantie en het delen van informatie maakt het steeds meer tot een uitdaging om mensen te bereiken en gezien te worden als organisatie. Laatsten hebben hierbij vaak steeds meer ogen en oren nodig om sneller in te zien waar de kansen liggen om op een duurzame manier te kunnen voorzien in deze behoeftes. In een ‘open economie’ worden problemen en vraagstukken op het gebied van nieuwe kansen steeds complexer en dus beter beantwoord, met behulp van collectieve kennis, de zogeheten ‘wisdom of the crowds’. Deze laatste bleek in het geval van de school in Roosendaal geoptimaliseerd door de combinatie van de Open Space methode en die van het ontwerpdenken (Designthinking) wat zogeheten ‘group think’ voorkomt doordat de organisatie zich committeert aan innovatie en het ondernemen van daadwerkelijke actiepunten hierop.
Het biedt organisaties de kans om meer verbonden, self-organiserende, co-creërende netwerken van mensen, initiatieven, en processen te worden waarbij de rol van het individu hierbij verschuift met nieuwe mogelijkheden tot connectiviteit, interactiviteit en samenwerking als gevolg. Dit betekent een radicale verandering van de sociale en economische maatschappelijke structuur[¹].

Het betekent een verschuiving in het paradigma van concurreren tegen elkaar naar concurreren met elkaar voor een beter en sterker gerepresenteerde markt.  Openheid en het uitwisselen van informatie bewijst een vruchtbare strategie om coalities te creëren met een gezamenlijke agenda en samenwerkingen die resulteren in hernieuwde relevantie en continuiteit voor organisaties in een dynamische (geglobaliseerde) markt met veranderende agenda’s. Eens temeer in een tijd waarin budgetten krapper worden. Het dwingt eveneens tot  een aangescherpt bewustzijn over kern competenties en economisch toegevoegde waarde.
Een goed voorbeeld blijft hierin het thema duurzaamheid, dat van een behoefte aan schoon en efficiënt energieverbruik is verworden tot een fundamenteel ontwerp principe dat allesomvattend is, van het wetenschappelijk onderzoek naar de structurering van arbeid tot mobiliteit, persoonlijke gezondheid, en leiderschap. Het schept een nieuwe rolverdeling die die de ‘duurzame organisatie’ mogelijk maakt[¹] en een breed scala aan specialisten laat samenwerken aan multidisciplinaire en vaak universele vraagstukken.

Ontwerp denken (Designthinking) [²] wordt steeds vaker erkend als effectieve (multi-disciplinaire) probleem oplossende methode. En zoals eerder gesteld bewijst het extra effectief te zijn in een Open Space setting. Beide met de intentie tot innoveren in het DNA, bepaalt Open Space de agenda (en dus de meest prangende vraagstukken) en Designthinking faciliteert een operationele mindset die nog onverkende mogelijkheden tot samenwerking als uitgangspunt neemt.
Design is in staat om bewustzijn te creëren rondom werkelijke behoeftes en om inhoudelijke waarde toe te voegen vaak met concurrentie voordeel als gevolg. De mens staat centraal in een ontwerp proces, dat uitgaat van een strategische middel-doel gerichte manier van werken. Op veel plekken in de maatschappij lijkt wat voorheen werkte nu niet meer te werken, vraagstukken zijn complexer geworden en steeds vaker een combinatie van culturele, maatschappelijke, sociale en economische aspecten. Het resultaat van een ontwerp proces is een product, dienst of proces dat voorziet in nieuwe manieren om deze verschuiving in vragen en behoeftes van mensen en markten te voorzien.
Of zoals Roger Martin stelt als hij schrijft over ontwerpen en geintegreerd denken: ‘Ontwerpers kunnen de meest complexe problemen of vraagstukken oplossen door een collaboratieve, geintegreerde en gebruikers-gerichte denkwijze te hanteren, gebaseerd op de logica van waarschijnlijkheid (abductie) oftewel de logica van wat zou kunnen zijn. Tegengesteld hieraan is deductieve of inductieve logica, die het bijzondere reduceert tot het algemene en uitgaat van generalisaties.
De niet-geintegreerde denker neemt hierdoor gewillig de kortste route, uitgaand van algemeenheden, terwijl de geïntegreerde denker juist op zoek gaat naar creatieve resolutie van zaken die vaak alleen op eerste gezicht op gespannen voet staan. Ergo: in het traditionele model, lijkt het dat men kiest tussen vastgelegde alternatieven. Een ontwerpproces daarentegen beweegt zich buiten bestaande data en alternatieven om met het doel tot nieuwe alternatieven en combinaties te komen.
Bolland en Collopy stellen dat een beslissings houding (decision attitude) overheerst in huidige management theorie en praktijk, waarin het gaat over het oplossen van bestaande, onveranderlijke problemen met duidelijk gespecificeerde alternatieven met behulp van analytische data vergaring. Dit in sterkt contrast tot ontwerp denken dat ieder vraagstuk als een kans ziet tot innovatie, en de ruimte biedt de initiële uitgangspunten te bevragen en tot een resolutie te komen middels nieuwe en innovatieve ideeën.’

Al met al was het een productieve dag in Roosendaal resulterend in een grote groep geïnspireerde probleem eigenaren klaar om aan de slag te gaan met het creëren van een hernieuwde en geoptimaliseerde leer omgeving.
Ik zou graag eindigen met een citaat van Goethe dat stelt ‘Alles is al eens bedacht, het is de kunst er weer aan te denken.’


Notes
[¹]  dr. T. Besselink, Recreating Honours Education, 2010

[²]  Design!Public glossary: Design Thinking Ways of thinking, conceptualizing, imagining, and envisioning solutions to problems that (i) redefine the fundamental challenge or task at hand, (ii) develop multiple possible options and solutions in parallel, and (iii) prioritize and select those which are likely to achieve the greatest benefits in terms of, for example, impact, viability, cost.

“Design thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation that draws from the designer’s toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business succes.”
— Tim Brown, president and CEO, IDEO, <http://www.ideo.com/about/>